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dc.contributor.authorCavanagh, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T18:48:14Z
dc.date.available2013-05-15T18:48:14Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/4378
dc.descriptionDr. Stuart D. Scott has written extensively in the fields of prehistory and history. As an archaeologist, he has traveled to some of the most significant sites in the world, including Pompeii, Stonehenge, the Valley of the Kings, Egypt’s pyramids and the Taj Mahal. He spent nine months excavating with the Tikal Project in Guatemala before returning to the University of Arizona where he received a Ph.D. in 1963. He excavated in New Zealand as a Fulbright scholar in 1963-1964. In the fall of 1964, Dr. Scott started a long career in the Anthropology Department of the State University of New York. He taught graduate and undergraduate archaeology courses and continued his archaeological and historical research. In 1979, Scott established the Old Fort Niagara Archaeology in Progress Project at Old Fort Niagara in Youngstown, New York. For many years, he became involved with historical archaeology in western New York. It was during this work that he became interested in the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837-1838 and its aftermath. Dr. Scott and his wife, Patricia Kay Scott, would use Christmas breaks, summer vacations, and sabbatical years to travel. They were repeatedly lured back to the South Pacific, conducting research in New Zealand, Australia and many of the Micronesian and Polynesian islands. To tell the whole story of the Rebellion and the prison exiles, they traveled extensively in Canada, the United States, England and Tasmania to collect archival research and to experience the scenes of this remarkable narrative. In 2004, Dr. Scott published To the Outskirts of Habitable Creation: Americans and Canadians Transported to Tasmania in the 1840s, which told the story of the men captured, tried, convicted, and exiled as a result of the Rebellion, also called the Patriot War. Other contributions include: • A collaboration with Dr. Charles Cazeau on the book Exploring the Unknown, Great Mysteries Reexamined published by Plenum Press in 1979 • The Patriot Game: New Yorkers and the Canadian Rebellion of 1837-1838, which appeared in New York History, Vol. 68, No.3. 1987 • A Frontier Spirit: The Life of James Gemmell published in Australiasian Canadian Studies, Vol. 25, No. 2 2007 • To the Outskirts of Habitable Creation which appeared in the Friends of the National Archives, Vol. 20, No. 1 2009 • Numerous academic journal publications • Service on conference panels • Various research papers and proposals Before retiring in 1997 and while still a resident of Buffalo, N.Y., Dr. Scott spent considerable time with Brock University President Emeritus James A. Gibson and History Professor Colin Duquemin. The three shared a love of Rebellion history. It was largely because of this connection that Brock University was chosen as the recipient of Dr. Scott’s research materials.en_US
dc.description.abstractCollection of materials from Canada, the United States, England and Australia related to research on Americans and Canadians exiled to the penal colony in Tasmania (Van Diemen’s Land) in the 1840s as a result of their involvement in the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837-38; includes books, archival materials (photocopies), dissertations, maps, and pictures.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRG;352
dc.subjectCaroline (steamer) -- Convict ships -- Exiles -- Canada -- Australia -- Port Arthur (Tasmania) -- Exiles' writings -- Hunters' Lodges (organization) -- Penal colonies -- Political prisoners -- Politics -- Government -- Samuel Chandler -- James Gemmell -- William Lyon Mackenzie -- Benjamin Waiten_US
dc.titleDr. Stuart D. Scott Papers, 1837-2010 (non-inclusive)en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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