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dc.contributor.authorMandri, Christina M.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T17:58:55Z
dc.date.available2013-04-09T17:58:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/4265
dc.description.abstractMicromorphology is used to analyze a wide range of sediments. Many microstructures have, as yet, not been analyzed. Rotation structures are the least understood of microstructures: their origin and development forms the basis of this thesis. Direction of rotational movement helps understand formative deformational and depositional processes. Twenty-eight rotation structures were analyzed through two methods of data extraction: (a) angle of grain rotation measured from Nikon NIS software, and (b) visual analyses of grain orientation, neighbouring grainstacks, lineations, and obstructions. Data indicates antithetic rotation is promoted by lubrication, accounting for 79% of counter-clockwise rotation structures while 21 % had clockwise rotation. Rotation structures are formed due to velocity gradients in sediment. Subglacial sediments are sheared due to overlying ice mass stresses. The grains in the sediment are differentially deformed. Research suggests rotation structures are formed under ductile conditions under low shear, low water content, and grain numbers inducing grain-to-grain interaction.en_US
dc.subjectRotation structuresen_US
dc.subjectDeposition of subglacial tillen_US
dc.titleDetermining rotational direction of rotation structures using prolate shaped grains within tillen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Earth Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Earth Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Mathematics and Scienceen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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