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dc.contributor.authorKilic, Gozde
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-08T17:05:10Z
dc.date.available2013-04-08T17:05:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/4261
dc.description.abstractABC's popular television series Lost has been praised as one of the most innovative programs in the history of broadcast television primarily due to its unique storytelling content and structure. In this thesis, I argue that in spite of its unconventional stances in terms of narrative, genre, and character descriptions, Lost still conforms to the conventional understanding of family, fatherhood, and subjectivity by perpetuating the psychoanalytic myth of the Oedipus complex. The series emphasizes the centrality of the father in the lives of the survivors, and constructs character developments according to Freud's essentialist and phallocentric conception of subjectivity. In this way, it continues the classic psychoanalytic tradition that views the father as the essence of one's identity. In order to support this argument, I conduct a discursive reading of the show's two main characters: Jack Shepherd and John Locke. Through such a reading, I explore and unearth the mythic/psychoanalytic importance of the father in the psychology of these fictional constructs.en_US
dc.subjectFatherhooden_US
dc.subjectLost (Television program)en_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.title"All The Best Cowboys Have Daddy Issues": [Post]Oedipal Fatherhood And Subjectivity In ABC's Losten_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Popular Cultureen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopular Culture Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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