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dc.contributor.authorCudmore, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T14:24:18Z
dc.date.available2012-09-18T14:24:18Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/4104
dc.description.abstractThis quantitative descriptive co-relational study used telephone survey interviews and stratified random sampling to collect data related to Social Capital (SC) and its components (trust and safety, reciprocity, civic engagement and collective action) and selected determinants of health variables in Niagara Region, Canada. Among the four components of social capital, trust and safety levels were highest among all participants (m=5.42, SD=1.0), with community engagement yielding the lowest mean score for the sample (m=1.93, SD=.8). Reciprocity had the strongest association with all other components of SC (r=0.51). Those most likely to report low levels of SC and health were unattached and low-income females. Males were more likely to report higher trust and safety levels and higher levels of self-rated health. In this study, a linear relationship between self-reported health status and SC was not found. Marital and employment status were associated with differences in mean scores of SC and self-reported health.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectSocial Capital Health Determinantsen_US
dc.subjectNiagaraen_US
dc.titleA Quantitative Study of Social Capital Components, Self-Reported Health Status and Social Determinants of Healthen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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