Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSokolowski, Tanya Christa
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-02T18:45:17Z
dc.date.available2012-04-02T18:45:17Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/3950
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the variables related to psychotropic medication use among 73 adults with intellectual disabilities living in community residential settings in Ontario, Canada over a one-year period based on staff reports. Despite only 16% percent having a documented psychiatric diagnosis, 84% of these individuals were receiving psychotropic medications, and 74% were receiving two or more psychotropic medications (polypharmacy). Anti-psychotics, anti-anxiety medications, and anti-convulsant medications were the most frequently reported drug classes. While problem behaviour was reported for 60% of the participants, only 33% had a formal behaviour plan. There was a significant relationship between the reported number of problem behaviours and the reported number of prescribed psychotropic medications. Reported medication reviews did not adhere to the Canadian 'Consensus Guidelines for the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities' (Sullivan et aI., 2006). Results, based on staff reports, suggested incongruence with recommended best practices, and raised concern about over-reliance on psychotropic medication with these individuals. Keywords: intellectual disabilities, psychotropic medication, problem behaviouren_US
dc.subjectPeople with mental disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectPsychotropic drugsen_US
dc.subjectCommunity mental health services -- Ontarioen_US
dc.titlePsychotropic medication use by adults with intellectual disabilities living in community settingsen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Applied Disability Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment ofChild and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record