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dc.contributor.authorStarkman, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T17:46:46Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17T17:46:46Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/3374
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative exploratory research investigates how Canadian Jewish girls understand the discursive stereotype of the Jewish American Princess (JAP), and how they take up these understandings of the J AP in relation to their identities. Three focus groups and six interviews were conducted with girls attending Jewish high schools in Toronto, Canada to explore these questions. From a third wave Jewish feminist perspective, and taking a mediated action approach to identity, two analyses were conducted. A thematic analysis of peer relations, gender, community, and religious understandings demonstrates how aspects of individual identities mediate interpretations of the JAP. A series ofpor t rai t s of JAP-related identity were constructed to analyze how the JAP discursive stereotype also functions as a cultural tool that is taken up by the participants to mediate expressions of their identities. These findings establish the contradictory ways these Jewish girls describe, interpret, and utilize the JAP discursive stereotype, and the complex roles it plays in their social worlds.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectEthnicityen_US
dc.subjectJewish womenen_US
dc.subjectStereotypes (Social psychology)en_US
dc.titleRevisiting the Jewish American princess : Jewish girls, the J.A.P. discursive stereotype, and negotiated identityen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Child and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment ofChild and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US


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