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dc.contributor.authorZurba, Zorianna.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-16T15:45:58Z
dc.date.available2010-02-16T15:45:58Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-16T15:45:58Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2913
dc.description.abstractBlogging software has popularly been used as a mode of writing about everyday life to interact with others. This thesis examines the political potentials that are opened up by self-reflective blogging. The self-reflective blog is a synergy of self-reflective practices and computer-mediated communication. A genealogy of the history of computer-mediated communication and various public self-reflective practices is conducted to uncover affect as the utility of various economies of subject production. Efforts made to blog-like the efforts made to interact online in other CMCs-are positioned as a kind of affective labor. Adapting Hardt and Negri's (2005) theorization of the multitude, whereby affective labor-the production of social relationshipsis a kind ofbiopolitical production, affect will be determined as a kind ofbiopolitical power that exists in everyday life.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectBlogs--Political aspects.en_US
dc.subjectBlogs--Social aspects.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception.en_US
dc.titleProduced subjectivities and productive subjects : locating the potential of the self-reflective blogen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Popular Cultureen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopular Culture Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Humanitiesen_US


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