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dc.contributor.authorSanli, Elizabeth Ann.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-16T15:45:53Z
dc.date.available2010-02-16T15:45:53Z
dc.date.issued2009-02-16T15:45:53Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2901
dc.description.abstractChildren were afforded the opportunity to control the order of repetitions for three novel spatiotemporal sequences. The following was predicted: a) children and adults in the self-regulated (SELF) groups would produce faster movement (MT) and reaction times (R T) and greater recall success (RS) during retention compared to the age-matched yoked (YOKE) groups; b) children would choose to switch sequences less often than adults; c) adults would produce faster MT and RT and greater RS than the children during acquisition and retention, independent of experimental group. During acquisition, no effects were seen for RS, however for MT and RT there was a main effect for age as well as block. During retention a main effect for practice condition was seen for RS and failed to reach statistical significance for MT and RT, thus partially supporting our first and second hypotheses. The third hypothesis was not supported.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectMotor learning.en_US
dc.subjectMotor ability in children--Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.titleAn examination of the effects on learning seen in children afforded the opportunity to control the order of repetitions for three novel spatiotemporal sequencesen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US


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