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dc.contributor.authorBader, Edward.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-16T19:22:17Z
dc.date.available2009-11-16T19:22:17Z
dc.date.issued2007-11-16T19:22:17Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2837
dc.description.abstractAn interdisciplinary approach is used to identify a new graphic novel genre, 'comics camet', and its key features. The study situates comics camet in a historical context and shows it to be the result of a cross-pollination between the American and French comics traditions. Comics camet incorporates features from other literary genres: journalism, autobiography, ethnography and travel writing. Its creators, primarily European rriales, document their experiences visiting countries that Europe has traditionally defined as belonging to the 'East'. A visual and narrative analysis, using theoretical perspectives derived from cultural and postcolonial studies, examines how comics camet represents the non-European other and identifies the genre's ideological assumptions. Four representative texts are examined: Joe Sacco's Palestine (2001), Craig Thompson's, Camet de Voyage (2004), Guy Delisle's Pyongyang (2005) and Mrujane Satrpi's Persespolis 2 (2004). The study concludes that the comics camet genre simultaneously reinforces and challenges stereotypical assumptions about non-European people and places.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectGraphic novels.en_US
dc.subjectTravel writing.en_US
dc.subjectStereotypes (Social psychology) in literature.en_US
dc.titleComics carnet : the graphic novelist as global nomaden_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Popular Cultureen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopular Culture Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Humanitiesen_US


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