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dc.contributor.authorDempsey, Sharon D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-09T18:54:53Z
dc.date.available2009-07-09T18:54:53Z
dc.date.issued1988-07-09T18:54:53Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2229
dc.description.abstractThis study is about expectations and aspirations of secondary school teachers. It is an investigation of why some teachers aspire to become administrators and why some teachers do not. My research compares expectations and existing attltudes regarding aspirations toward administration which are held by three distinct groups within the secondary school system: 1) principals/vice-principals, 2) aspiring teachers, and 3) non-aspiring teachers. This study questions why, in the late 60's, secondary school administration is still predominated by men. The conclusions and recommendations were based on interviews with thirty men and women in the Hamilton Secondary School System. In addltion, Mr. Keith Rielly, Superintendent of Operations, made valuable contributions to my work. The interviews revealed experiences and percept ions of men and women in di scourse about f amil y re lat i onshi ps, educational choices and perceived internal and external barriers which inhiblted or enhanced their decision to aspire to secondary school administration. Candidates spoke about their personal and professional Hves wlth respect to encouragement, perceived images of an administrator, netWOrking and the effect of marriage and children on their careers. Historically, women have not accepted the challenge of administration and It would appear as if this is still the case today. My research suggests that women are under-represented in secondary school administration because of internal and external barriers which discourage many women from aspiring. I conclude that many of women's internal barrlers are reinforced by external roadblocks which prevent women from aspiring to secondory school administration. Thus. many women who do not envision a future in educational administration establish priorities outside the general realm of education. I recommend that males and females recognize that women make valuable contributions to educational theory and design based on their experiences which may be "differene from mole experiences. but just as significant. Mole and female representation in secondary school administration represents a balance between attitudes and behaviours which can not be accomplished when an administrative offlce is dominated by on all ma1e or all female staff.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectHigh schools--Administration.en_US
dc.subjectExpectation (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectHigh schools--Ontario--Hamilton--Administration.en_US
dc.subjectSchool management and organization--Ontario--Hamilton.en_US
dc.titleWho expects what from whom? : a gender based study on expectations and secondary school administrationen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Educationen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Educationen_US


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