Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRickard, Ted J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-09T18:42:57Z
dc.date.available2009-07-09T18:42:57Z
dc.date.issued1998-07-09T18:42:57Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2059
dc.description.abstractSix lefthanded artist-educators were interviewed to attempt to discover any patterns t6 their perceptions and experiences. Artists have their own culture and priorities. According to the literature, lefthanded people appear more likely to suffer from dyslexia, allergies, asthma and other auto-immune diseases as well as machinery and equipment injuries. Patterns emerging suggested that lefthanded people indeed suffer more from dyslexia. More startling was the distinct possibility that many artists have traumatic childhood histories. This would commonly include negative school experiences, and for a significant number sexual assault, perceived or actual abandonment by parents, and/or consistently low selfesteem. The researcher discovered possible reasons why creative people frequently have problems at school, why they tend to be rebellious and anti-establishment oriented, how many of them perceive societal rules, and why they are more likely to be lefthanded. These characteristics all have significant implications for art school administrators.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectArtisten_US
dc.subjectVisualen_US
dc.subjectLeft- and right-handednessen_US
dc.subjectLeft and right (Psychology)en_US
dc.titleSinister creativity: a phenomenological exploration of some of the experiences and perceptions of six lefthanded visual artistsen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Educationen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Educationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record