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Enhancing pnemonia surveillance in acute care facilities in post SARS era : a Canadian hospital surveillance study, 2003-2004 influenza season

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dc.contributor.author Feltrin, Carla Fiocca. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-15T17:00:44Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-15T17:00:44Z
dc.date.issued 2005-06-15T17:00:44Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10464/1624
dc.description.abstract A retrospective study of patients hospitalized with influenza and/or pneumonia in a Niagara area community hospital for the influenza season 2003-04 was designed with the main goal of enhancing pneumonia surveillance in acute care facilities and the following specific objectives: 1) identify etiologies, factors, and clinical presentation associated with pneumonia; 2) assess the ODIN score on ICU patients to predict outcomes of severe pneumonia; 3) identify the frequency of pneumonia and influenza in a hospital setting; and 4) develop a hospital pneumonia electronic surveillance tool. A total of 172 patients' charts (50% females) were reviewed and classified into two groups: those with diagnosis of pneumonia (n=132) and those without pneumonia (n=40). The latter group consisted mainly of patients with influenza (85%). Most patients were young (<10yrs) or elderly (>71yrs). Presenting body temperature <38°C, cough symptoms, respiratory and cardiac precomorbidities were common in both groups. Pneumonia was more frequent in males (p= .032) and more likely community-acquired (98%) than nosocomial (2%). No evidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was found. Microbiology testing in 72% of cases detected 19 different pathogens. In pneumonia patients the most common organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (3%), Respiratory syncytial virus (4%), and Influenza A virus (2%). Conversely, Influenza A virus was identified in 73% of non-pneumonia patients. Community-acquired influenza was more common (80%) than nosocomial influenza (20%). The ODIN score was a good predictor of mortality and the new electronic surveillance tool was an effective prototype to monitor patients in acute care, especially during influenza season. The results of this study provided baseline data on respiratory illness surveillance and demonstrated that future research, including prospective studies, is warranted in acute care facilities. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Brock University en_US
dc.subject Pneumonia en_US
dc.subject Pneumonia en_US
dc.subject Pneumonia en_US
dc.subject Public health surveillance. en_US
dc.title Enhancing pnemonia surveillance in acute care facilities in post SARS era : a Canadian hospital surveillance study, 2003-2004 influenza season en_US
dc.type Electronic Thesis or Dissertation en_US
dc.degree.name M.Sc. Applied Health Sciences en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.contributor.department Applied Health Sciences Program en_US


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