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Abrasion, transport and distribution of sediment in selected streams of Southern Ontario and Western New York /

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dc.contributor.author Kester, Stephen Joseph. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-09T18:16:26Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-09T18:16:26Z
dc.date.issued 1985-06-09T18:16:26Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10464/1566
dc.description.abstract The rate of decrease in mean sediment size and weight per square metre along a 54 km reach of the Credit River was found to depend on variations in the channel geometry. The distribution of a specific sediment size consist of: (1) a transport zone; (2) an accumulation zone; and (3) a depletion zone. These zones shift downstream in response to downcurrent decreases in stream competence. Along a .285 km man-made pond, within the Credit River study area, the sediment is also characterized by downstream shifting accumulation zones for each finer clast size. The discharge required to initiate movement of 8 cm and 6 cm blocks in Cazenovia Creek is closely approximated by Baker and Ritter's equation. Incipient motion of blocks in Twenty Mile Creek is best predicted by Yalin's relation which is more efficient in deeper flows. The transport distance of blocks in both streams depends on channel roughness and geometry. Natural abrasion and distribution of clasts may depend on the size of the surrounding sediment and variations in flow competence. The cumulative percent weight loss with distance of laboratory abraded dolostone is defined by a power function. The decrease in weight of dolostone follows a negative exponential. In the abrasion mill, chipping causes the high initial weight loss of dolostone; crushing and grinding produce most of the subsequent weight loss. Clast size was found to have little effect on the abrasion of dolostone within the diameter range considered. Increasing the speed of the mill increased the initial amount of weight loss but decreased the rate of abrasion. The abrasion mill was found to produce more weight loss than stream action. The maximum percent weight loss determined from laboratory and field abrasion data is approximately 40 percent of the weight loss observed along the Credit River. Selective sorting of sediment explains the remaining percentage, not accounted for by abrasion. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Brock University en_US
dc.subject Rivers en_US
dc.subject Rivers en_US
dc.subject Sediments (Geology) en_US
dc.subject Sediments (Geology) en_US
dc.subject Sediment transport en_US
dc.subject Sediment transport en_US
dc.subject Stream measurements en_US
dc.subject Stream measurements en_US
dc.title Abrasion, transport and distribution of sediment in selected streams of Southern Ontario and Western New York / en_US
dc.type Electronic Thesis or Dissertation en_US
dc.degree.name M.Sc. Earth Sciences en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.contributor.department Department of Earth Sciences en_US
dc.degree.discipline Faculty of Mathematics and Science en_US


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