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Drift dispersal in central Southern Ontario /

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dc.contributor.author Podolak, Wilfred E. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-01T19:30:26Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-01T19:30:26Z
dc.date.issued 1984-06-01T19:30:26Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10464/1499
dc.description.abstract Two tills are readily identi-f i able in central Southern Ontario, a very stony, loose deposit o-f variable matrix (Dummer till) and a moderately stony, fissile and compact deposit that is more homogeneous (drumlinized till). The quantity o-f Precambr i an, Paleozoic and Shadow Lake Formation (Paleozoic) rock types were determined and corresponding isopleth maps drawn. The changes in lithology content occurred in the direction o-f transport, there-fore, compositional isopleths o-f till may be considered equipotential lines for the reconstruction of glacier flow paths. Areal gradations of drift lithology indicated that the prime agents of dispersal were ice and glacial meltwaters. The down-ice abundance trend of till components indicated a dispersal pattern showing the concentration of a given lithology type peaking within a few kilometres of the source followed by a rapid decline and thereafter, a more gradual decrease with increasing distance. Within the esker deposits, igneous rocks may form the major component and can extend further onto the limestone plain than in the adjacent till. Evidence is presented that indicates the "style" of dispersal was one in which glacial ice may have been strongly influenced by local bedrock topography and the regional structural trends. The ice tended to follow pre-existing valleys and lows, depositing till composed mainly of local bedrock. Gradations in Paleozoic clast content showed that the local bedrock lithology became the primary till component within 3 km of down-ice transport. Evidence is presented that indicated the last glaciation may have occurred as a relatively thin ice mass, followed by stagnation and recession. No evidence of a lateglacial re-advance was found within the study area. Because of the lack of a contact between the Dummer and drumlinized till, and because of results showing gradation of the Dummer till into the drumlinized till (as indicated by lithology content and grain size), it is suggested that no re-advance occurred. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Brock University en_US
dc.subject Drift en_US
dc.subject Geology en_US
dc.title Drift dispersal in central Southern Ontario / en_US
dc.type Electronic Thesis or Dissertation en_US
dc.degree.name M.Sc. Earth Sciences en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.contributor.department Department of Earth Sciences en_US
dc.degree.discipline Faculty of Mathematics and Science en_US


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