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dc.contributor.authorCormier, Andre.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-21T13:54:42Z
dc.date.available2009-05-21T13:54:42Z
dc.date.issued2007-05-21T13:54:42Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/1392
dc.description.abstractWhy are there so many disabled characters in James Joyce's Ulysses? "Disabled Legislators" seeks to answer this question by exploring the variety and depth of disability's presence in Joyce's novel. This consideration also recognizes the unique place disability finds within what Lennard Davis calls "the roster of the disenfranchised" in order to define Joyce as possessing a "disability consciousness;" that is, an empathetic understanding (given his own eye troubles) of the damaged lives of the disabled, the stigmatization of the disabled condition, and the appropriation of disabled representations by literary works reinforcing normalcy. The analysis of four characters (Gerty MacDowell, the blind stripling, the onelegged sailor, and Stephen Dedalus) treats disability as a singular self-concept, while still making necessary associations to comparably created marginal identities-predominantly the colonial Other. This effort reevaluates how Ulysses operates in opposition to liberal Victorian paradigms, highlighting disability's connections to issues of gender, intolerance, self-identification and definition.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectJoyce, James, 1882-1941en_US
dc.subjectJoyce, James, 1882-1941en_US
dc.subjectPolitics and literatureen_US
dc.subjectLiterature and historyen_US
dc.titleDisabled legislators : disability and Irish colonial pathology in James Joyce's Ulyssesen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Humanitiesen_US


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