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dc.contributor.authorThienpont, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorPerreault, Joelle
dc.contributor.authorKorosi, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorPisaric, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBlais, Jules
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-03T14:24:15Z
dc.date.available2019-01-03T14:24:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-30
dc.identifier.citationThienpont, Joshua R., et al. “Have Natural Lake Expansion and Landscape Inundation Resulted in Mercury Increases in Flooded Lakes of the Great Slave Lowlands (Northwest Territories, Canada)?” Journal of Paleolimnology, Nov. 2018. Crossref, doi:10.1007/s10933-018-0063-7.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-0417
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/13869
dc.description.abstractThe inundation of terrestrial vegetation following landscape flooding is an important potential source of mercury to aquatic ecosystems, and may modify mercury cycling, such as through increased methylation. In the Great Slave Lowlands of Canada’s Northwest Territories, remarkable landscape flooding has occurred over the recent past, which is the most notable in at least the last several centuries. The potential for this flooding to increase inorganic mercury flux to the lakes of the region has not yet been explored. In this study we used sediment cores from five lakes experiencing a range of recently documented lake expansion to test whether inundation of terrestrial areas has increased the total mercury concentrations in sediments, and resulted in increased total mercury flux. Increases in sedimentary mercury concentrations and fluxes in sediment cores from the expanding lakes were relatively small and within the range of non-expanded systems, suggesting that, to date, flooding has not resulted in major total mercury enrichment, unlike in experimental and natural reservoir impoundments. The potential for increased methylation of existing inorganic mercury following expansion was not explored in this paper because methylmercury is dynamic in sediments and does not preserve well, but is an important consideration for future work.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program (Government of the Northwest Territories), the W. Garfield Weston Foundation (postdoctoral fellowship to JRT), the Brock University Chancellor’s Chair for Research Excellence (MFJP), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Discovery Grants to MFJP and JMB, Northern Supplement to MFJP and a PDF to JBK).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlandsen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectcontaminantsen_US
dc.subjectfloodingen_US
dc.subjectlake sedimentsen_US
dc.subjectpaleolimnologyen_US
dc.subjectmercuryen_US
dc.titleHave natural lake expansion and landscape inundationresulted in mercury increases in flooded lakes of the GreatSlave Lowlands (Northwest Territories, Canada)?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10933-018-0063-7


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